Wordless Wednesday

Morning glories

About Eliza Waters

Gardener, writer, photographer, naturalist
Image | This entry was posted in Country Gardening, My Photos and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

45 Responses to Wordless Wednesday

  1. Anne says:

    I enjoy the way you have captured the illumination of these blossoms.

  2. Aah Morning Glory, my mother-in-law used to grow them. Brings back fond memories.

    • Eliza Waters says:

      Thank you, Sandra. I’m glad they are good memories. πŸ™‚
      These are self-sowing annuals, so much easier and quicker to bloom than ‘Heavenly Blue.’ Our season is too short to make those worth growing, pretty as that blue is. I’ve never tried starting them earlier inside, which might work, however.

  3. Alice says:

    The ‘star’ in the Morning Glory is so pretty. The genus of Ipomoeas are an interesting group. I have a Sweet Potato vine ‘Blackie,’ this year with very dark birds foot like leaves & lots of pink flowers, a pretty contrast. Moonflower is also gorgeous and very photogenic.

    • Eliza Waters says:

      Thank you, Alice. I like sweet potato vines, such a great annual for us. I grew Moonflowers once, but as they open at night, I found I didn’t get to enjoy them much. πŸ˜‰

  4. Kris P says:

    Such beautiful flowers! They’re not pests in your area? Here, we’re warned not to plant them in the ground. I took my chances once and lived to regret it.

    • Eliza Waters says:

      Thank you, Kris! While I. purpurea will self-sow, our winters stop their endless climbing, so they don’t get a chance to be a problem. The seedlings are easy to yank if there get to be too many in early spring. Bindweed (Convolvulus arvensis) is a perennial weed here and it is a nuisance, its stolons impossible to eradicate.

  5. So lovely! Wonderful light.

  6. Irene says:

    Love morning glories! Beautifully highlighted by the sunshine. 😊

  7. Murtagh's Meadow says:

    I do like morning Glory. I must grow it again.

  8. Lovely Eliza, I do like the deep purple of these flowers.

  9. arlingwoman says:

    It always amazes me how the morning glory blossoms look like light is emanating from them.

  10. So pretty! I don’t recognize the white flowers. Are they a vine as well? And if so what light do they prefer along with the Morning Glories? I have a spot in my gardens for a trellis that faces East and I’m trying to figure out what vine(s) to put there. LOVE this image, Eliza! Thank you!

    • Eliza Waters says:

      Thank you, Amy! Those are actually 6′ Nicotiana blossoms – about twice the size they normally grow. Amazing height probably due to being shaded. They self-sow and that combo was a happy accident.
      Morning Glories are annuals and this variety will self-sow (I’d be happy to send you seed at the end of the season if you want to plant some this fall for next spring). Another nice annual is Black-eyed Susan Vine (Thunbergia alata), which comes in orange, yellow or white flowers. My sister mixes the yellow one and the purple MGs together on the same trellis – looks good.
      For perennial vines, there are Honeysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens), fragrant and lots of hybrids or one of the smaller Clematis like C. viticella ‘Betty Corning’ might be nice. You’ll have to let me know what you decide upon!

  11. Glories of the morning! 😊

  12. What a nice way to greet the new day!

  13. Jet Eliot says:

    Wonderful how you captured the glory of summer here, Eliza. Thank you!

  14. Robin says:

    How pretty! I love the way you captured the light and shadows.

  15. Adele Brand says:

    Lovely. Once again it makes me want to sit there and read a book! The light on the blossoms is so peaceful.

  16. Joanna says:

    So so pretty Eliza! The nicotiana looks lovely there too! My purpureas have started blooming but they are still only a coupe feet high.

  17. These morning glory’s are glorious! My daughter and I, had a sea of morning glory, outside the house we had when she was little. Beautiful Eliza!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.